creating a literature review



Creating a literature review

If you have any questions, comments,Or suggestions to improve these guidelines please me at e-mail hrallis@ines for writing a literature review.

Literature review is not an annotated bibliography in which you summarize briefly each article that you have reviewed.

While a summary of the what you have read is contained within the literature review, it goes well beyond merely summarizing professional literature.

Galvan outlines a very clear, step-by-step approach that is very useful to use as you write your review.

I have integrated some other tips within this guide, particularly in suggesting different technology tools that you might want to consider in helping you organize your review.

I also provide links at the end of this guide to resources that you should use in order to search the literature and as you write your addition to using the step-by-step guide that i have provided below, i also recommend that you (a) locate examples of literature reviews in your field of study and skim over these to get a feel for what a literature review is and how these are written (i have also provided links to a couple of examples at the end of these guidelines (b) read over other guides to writing literature reviews so that you see different perspectives and approaches: some examples are:Review of literature: university of wisconsin - madison the writing to ..


Constructing a literature review

Bluford ed links to resources on writing a literature through the links provided below on apa guidelines so that you become familiar with the common core elements of how to write in apa style: in particular, pay attention to general document guidelines (e.

Font, margins, spacing), title page, abstract, body, text citations, will help you considerably if your topic for your literature review is the one on which you intend to do your final . However, you may pick any scholarly 3: identify the literature that you will review:Familiarize yourself with online databases (see umd library resource links below for help with this), identifying relevant databases in your field of relevant databases, search for literature sources using google scholar and also searching using furl (search all sources, including the furl accounts of other furl members).

Some tips for identifying suitable literature and narrowing your search :Start with a general descriptor from the database thesaurus or one that you know is already a well defined descriptor based on past work that you have done in this field.

You will need to experiment with different searches, such as limiting your search to descriptors that appear only in the document titles, or in both the document title and in the ne your topic if needed: as you search you will quickly find out if the topic that you are reviewing is too broad.


Database searching

Try to narrow it to a specific area of interest within the broad area that you have chosen (remember: this is merely an introductory literature review for educ 7001).

It is a good idea, as part of your literature search, to look for existing literature reviews that have already been written on this part of your search, be sure to identify landmark or classic studies and theorists as these provide you with a framework/context for your your references into your refworks account (see: refworks import directions for guide on how to do this from different databases). You can also enter references manually into refworks if you need you have identified and located the articles for your review, you need to analyze them and organize them before you begin writing:Overview the articles: skim the articles to get an idea of the general purpose and content of the article (focus your reading here on the abstract, introduction and first few paragraphs, the conclusion of each article.


Scientists

Key statistics that you may want to use in the introduction to your useful quotes that you may want to include in your review.

Important: if you copy the exact words from an article, be sure to cite the page number as you will need this should you decide to use the quote when you write your review (as direct quotes must always be accompanied by page references).

Note: although you may collect a large number of quotes during the note taking phase of your review, when you write the review, use quotes very sparingly.

Your role as a reviewer is to evaluate what you read, so that your review is not a mere description of different articles, but rather a critical analysis that makes sense of the collection of articles that you are reviewing.

Major trends or patterns: as you read a range of articles on your topic, you should make note of trends and patterns over time as reported in the literature.


Systematic reviews

This step requires you to synthesize and make sense of what you read, since these patterns and trends may not be spelled out in the literature, but rather become apparent to you as you review the big picture that has emerged over time. Your analysis can make generalizations across a majority of studies, but should also note inconsistencies across studies and over fy gaps in the literature, and reflect on why these might exist (based on the understandings that you have gained by reading literature in this field of study).

You may also note that studies fall into different categories (categories that you see emerging or ones that are already discussed in the literature).


Citation analysis

When you write your review, you should address these relationships and different categories and discuss relevant studies using this as a your review focused on your topic: make sure that the articles you find are relevant and directly related to your topic. As you take notes, record which specific aspects of the article you are reading are relevant to your topic (as you read you will come up with key descriptors that you can record in your notes that will help you organize your findings when you come to write up your review).


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